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Assistive Technology

ACL's Center for Integrated Programs, Office of Consumer Access and Self-Determination, oversees the State Grant for Assistive Technology Program and the Assistive Technology National Activities funded under the Assistive Technology Act of 1998, as amended (AT Act of 2004).

  • The State Grant for Assistive Technology Program (#AG90) supports state efforts to improve the provision of assistive technology to individuals with disabilities of all ages through comprehensive, statewide programs that are consumer-responsive. The State Grant for Assistive Technology Program makes assistive technology devices and services more available and accessible to individuals with disabilities and their families. The program provides one grant to each state, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the outlying areas (American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, and the U.S. Virgin Islands). The State Grant for Assistive Technology Program is a formula grant program; there are no grant competitions. The amount of each state’s annual award is based largely on state population.

  • General contact information for state assistive technology programs can be found in the State Assistive Technology Program Directory on the AT3 Center website. Specific program contact information, including Lead Agency and Implementing Entity, for the State Grant for AT programs is contained in the State Plan

  • The Assistive Technology National Activities Program (#AN90) provides information and technical assistance through grants, contracts, or cooperative agreements, on a competitive basis, to individuals, service providers, states, protection and advocacy entities, and others to support and improve the implementation of the AT Act of 2004. Grants awarded under this program are competitive and open to public or private entities, including for-profit organizations and institutions of higher education with relevant expertise.

  • Mandatory funding allocation information is available.

  • Learn more about the Assistive Technology Act and history of the legislation.

In FY 2005, Congress amended the AT Act to eliminate the separate Alternative Financing Program authorization and instead authorized an AT State grant program that is inclusive of financing activities, including alternative financing loan programs. Each State Grant for Assistive Technology program includes financing activities. In FY 2015 and FY 2016 Congress appropriated funding separate and apart from the Assistive Technology Act for the purposes of making Alternative Financing program grants.

Awards

  • 2016 Awards under the State Grant for Assistive Technology Program
  • 2016 and 2015 Awards under the Alternative Financing Program

    Assistive Technology State Plans

    The AT Act of 2004 requires states to submit an application in order to receive funds under the State Grant for AT Program. The application must be in the form of a three-year State Plan for Assistive Technology (AT). The State AT Plans describe how states will implement their program. During the three-year period covered by the plan, a state may be required to submit amendments and updates. Individual state plans can be accessed along with a summary of State AT Program information.

    Annual Progress Reports (APR)

    The AT Act also requires states to submit annual progress reports detailing the delivery of authorized activities. The annual report includes data on state financing, reuse, device loan, device demonstration, training, technical assistance, information and assistance, and public awareness activities along with state improvement outcomes and funding leveraged during the reporting period. Individual and national summary data can be accessed

    Return on Investment

    The State Assistive Technology Programs carry out a cohesive continuum of specified state level and state leadership activities that promote the ability of people with disabilities to know about, have access to, and ultimately be better able to obtain assistive technology. Read the 2016 Return on Investment Report to learn how these programs deliver a large return on investment.  

    Frequently Asked Questions

    What is Assistive Technology (AT)?

    Assistive Technology (AT) is any item, device, or piece of equipment used to maintain or improve the independence and function of people with disabilities and seniors, in education, employment, recreation, and daily living activities. AT devices can be “low tech” like a built-up handle on a spoon to improve the ability to grasp, to “high tech” computers controlled with eye movement. AT devices can be do-it-yourself, or even consumer electronics like home automation solutions that can be more than just a convenience for a person with a disability! AT includes the services necessary to get and use the devices, including assessment, customization, repair, and training.

    Where can I learn more about the AT Act?

    The Assistive Technology Act Training and Technical Assistance Center (AT3) provides information and resources on the Assistive Technology Act. Visit their website to learn more about the AT Act.

    How do I find my State AT Program?

    A directory of State AT Programs with contact information can be found at on the AT3 Center website. Additional information about each State AT Program can be found on the Center for Assistive Technology Act Data Assistance (CATADA) website. This includes an overview of activities conducted by each State AT Program along with their State Plan.

    What services do State AT Programs provide?

    There are four state level activities authorized by the AT Act. AT Demonstration activities provide opportunities for people to become familiar with specific types of AT by comparing and contrasting the functions and features of devices through hands-on exploration guided by a knowledgeable professional. AT Device Loan activities allow individuals to borrow AT for a limited time period to try out and determine if a device will meet their needs before a purchase is made. AT Reutilization activities support the reuse of assistive technology that is no longer needed or used by its original owner and is acquired by a new owner at substantial cost savings. AT State Financing activities support the purchase/acquisition of AT through financial loans or other initiatives that directly provide AT to consumers at no cost using dollars from non-AT Act sources or save consumers money when purchasing AT. State Leadership activities authorized by the AT Act include providing training, technical assistance, information and referral, and public awareness throughout the state.

    Where do State AT Programs get Training and Technical Assistance?

    The AT3 Center provides training and technical assistance to State AT Programs.

    Where can the general public find information about AT?

    The national public internet site at AT3 Center Explore AT will provide the public and others with a wide range of assistive technology resources. In addition, your state’s AT program can assist you in finding the information you need about AT devices and services.

    Additional Resources

    Assistive Technology Act Technical Assistance & Training (AT3) Center

    The Assistive Technology Act Technical Assistance & Training (AT3) Center is a project administered by the Association of Assistive Technology Act Programs (ATAP) and funded by a grant from the US Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Community Living (ACL), authorized by Section 6 of the Assistive Technology (AT) Act. The AT3 Center provides training and technical assistance to the State AT Programs funded under Section 4 of the AT Act to (1) support quality implementation of state level and state leadership activities and (2) develop and maintain a national assistive technology internet site that makes general AT information available to the public and other stakeholders. The AT3 Center website provides information and support for all Section 4 authorized activities: state financing, reuse, short-term device loan, device demonstration, training, technical assistance, public awareness and information and assistance, and collaborations that improve access to and acquisition of assistive technology (e.g. through policy improvements).

    NOTE: A separate technical assistance provider, the National Disability Rights Network, is responsible for providing training and technical assistance for the Section 5 AT Act grantees as part of its technical assistance to Protection and Advocacy agencies.

    Center for AT Act Data Assistance  (CATADA)

    The Center for Assistive Technology Act Data Assistance (CATADA) is a project administered by the University of Massachusetts—Boston, Institute for Community Inclusion and funded under a grant (Section 6 of the AT Act) from the Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Community Living (ACL), authorized by Section 6 of the Assistive Technology (AT) Act. CATADA provides data collection and reporting technical assistance and support to State AT Programs funded under Section 4 of the AT Act. The CATADA website provides annual data for all of the major AT Act activities for all 56 State AT Program grantees for fiscal year 2013 through present. Documents summarizing national data by fiscal year can be found on the CATADA website, as well as individual State AT Program profile descriptions, current state plans, and links to each State AT Program’s website.

    Association of Assistive Technology Act Programs (ATAP)

    The Association of Assistive Technology Act Programs (ATAP) is a national, member-based non-profit organization, comprised of state Assistive Technology Act Programs funded under the Assistive Technology Act (AT Act). ATAP facilitates the coordination of state AT Programs nationally and provides technical assistance and support to its members. Established in 1997, the organization strives to enhance the effectiveness of AT Programs on the national, state, and local level. ATAP promotes the national network of AT Programs, represents the needs and interests of the programs, and serves as the national representative of state AT programs.

    Other Documents/Forms

    Contacts

    Rob Groenendaal
    Assistive Technology Program 
    Robert.Groenendaal@acl.hhs.gov 
    202-795-7356

     


Last modified on 08/30/2017


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